Quintessential Character Type 4

Type
4

Character Role
Inspired Creator, Self-Aware Intuitive, Self-Revealing Individual, Imaginative Aesthete, Self-Indulgent "Exception", Alienated Depressive, Emotionally Tormented Person, Self-Destructive Person, Sociopathic Killer, Actor, Artist, Bard, Elitist, Empath, Guidance Counselor, Individualist, Musician, Poet, Psychologist, Romantic

Ego Fixation
Melancholy, Fantasizing

Sacred Ideal
Universal Origin

Basic Desire
To be uniquely themselves, to understand self

Basic Fear
Having no identity or significance, being defective

Tendency
Overuse of imagination in search of self

Vice/Passion
Envy

Virtue
Equanimity, Emotional Balance

Stress
When this character is pressured or threatened, he loses touch with his feelings and feels ordinary and unspecial.

Security
When this character is relaxed and secure, he becomes less moody and more responsible.

Focus
This character's focus goes to the search for meaning, what is missing, and the longing for the unavailable. 

Flaw
This character's character flaw is based on the incorrect belief there's an ideal love or circumstance that, when found, will make him feel loved and complete. He avoids being ordinary. During the story, he learns this constant focus on what is missing is causing problems with what he already possesses. 

Self Definition
I am unique. I am special. I am creative.

This character perceives himself as being different or unique. This uniqueness, which he centers his personality around, can be a gift or a curse. It can be wonderful when it sets them apart from common people and generates admiration from others. It can be a horrible curse when it separates them from simple forms of happiness that others seem to enjoy.

This character is emotionally complex and very sensitive. He looks to creative self-expression as a way to be understood and appreciated for his authentic self, but often feels he's misunderstood and unappreciated. Whether artistic or not, he's unique in the way he express himself, the clothes he wears or the unorthodox way he approaches life, language, and relationships. He can feel superior to others while harboring longing and envy.

Background
This character never identified with either parent. His parents seemed to be from another planet. He was left alone to discover his own personality. This self-discovery became his life mission. His only option was to look inside to see what he could find. As a child, he tried to fit in by compromising his authentic self because he didn't feel safe. He always regretted this. As an adult, he's introspective, even to the point of losing himself in thought, becoming reclusive at times, and avoiding distracting people, noise, and activity.

Education
Having, at least, an average intelligence and education, this character tends to lead a double life, hard working and focused on work or a project, but plays jazz or paints at night. He possesses more knowledge of the art world than a normal person.

Work
At work, this character is creative and expressive, always thinking outside of the box. He usually tests assumptions in the workplace, providing the necessary energy to keep the company alive and growing. He’s attracted to either emotionally intense jobs or creative and unique jobs.

Relationships
This character can be sensitive and emotionally honest in a relationship. Others may be drawn to his depth of feeling, but later feel that he subtly rejects them when they get too close. He tends to be attracted to Type 1s for friends and generally avoids Type 2s.

With Type 1 - The Reformer
Type 1s and this character support and admire each other's idealism and sensitivity.  But Type 1s can become resentful of this character's self-absorption and moodiness.  This character attempts to turn the tables by making Type 1s feel like the one who is lacking by keeping a list of examples of pickiness and control. 

With Type 2 - The Helper
This pairing can be interesting since both characters are emotionally needy.  Type 2s can be captivated by the emotions and intensity of this character and lose their sense of separateness. Then Type 2s may get impatient with the self-absorption of this character who, in turn, can be put off by Type 2's inability to stand alone. Type 2s can feel unappreciated and erupt in anger, while this character feels rejected and pulls away. 

With Type 3 - The Achiever
Type 3s benefit from this character's authenticity and creativity, while this character benefits from Type 3's support for accomplishment. However, Type 3s can become impatient with this character's tendency to get off track and waste time with feelings. This character hates Type 3's tendency to avoid feeling and inattention to the relationship.

With Type 4 - The Individualist
In experiencing each other's passion, depth of feeling, and creativity, this character and Type 4s can idolize each other. This sets them up for a general feeling of disappointment with each other. They also compete with each other for acknowledgement, support, and attention. Dramatic moodiness and anger over disappointments arise.

With Type 5 - The Analyst
This character's emotional depth and relationship focus and Type 5's thoughtful analysis tend to balance each other.  However, in general, this character desires more and Type 5s desire less from the relationship.  This character can perceive Type 5s as emotionally unavailable and controlling, while Type 5s perceive this character as too emotional and difficult to satisfy. This character can become more demanding of attention as Type 5s detach.

With Type 6 - The Loyalist
This character is attracted to Type 6's loyalty. They connect with their shared doubts about fulfillment. Type 6s appreciate the creative flair and emotional depth of this character, Conflict arises when this character seems insatiable in desiring whatever he perceives is lacking. Type 6s may feel unsupported and doubt this character's intentions. Attempting to help this character out of suffering, Type 6s attempt to fix this character. If that fails, Type 6s become controlling and accusatory. This leads to further disappointment by this character. 

With Type 7 - The Enthusiast
This character's emotional depth and interest in the inner world complements Type 7's pleasure orientation and desire to keep life upbeat. Conflict occurs when Type 7's optimistic stance polarizes with this character's focus on darker feelings and whatever he perceives is missing. Such situations may result in this character openly disdaining Type 7's avoidance of painful feelings and deep connection. Type 7s disdain this character's excess of feelings and tendency to become stuck in an emotional rut. This character desires more attention, authenticity, and to express disappointment. Type 7s become impatient and desires to escape from the relationship. 

With Type 8 - The Challenger
This character and Type 8s share strength of intensity, expressiveness, excessiveness, and conviction. However, this character may perceive Type 8s as overpowering, insensitive, dominating, and crude with his all-or-nothing declarations. Type 8s may perceive this character as overly dramatic, emotional, self-absorbed, and demanding.  This character resists what perceives as Type 8's domination. 

With Type 9 - The Peacemaker
This character appreciates Type 9's attention. Type 9s appreciate this character's creative flair and emotional depth. However, Type 9s can get swept up in This Character's drama. When this character expresses a desire for more action and initiative, Type 9s first attempt to satisfy that. Eventually, Type 9s feel frustrated by this character's demands for more. This character sees Type 9s as being diverted into inessentials. Type 9s may become stubborn. Both characters hate to be controlled, becoming angry and blaming each other.

Introvert Type
Healthy (usually Hero or Love Interest)
This character is the withdrawn artistic type. He searches inside his heart for answers, discovers who he is by what he finds there, and creates outward expressions of selfThis introvert type considers what he thinks as the real qualifier. He is in it to discover himself and not to make money or find fame.  

He's successfully found within himself a universal thing, something that manifests itself through the artwork, that is, his expression of self. This universality draws people to him. This character can be reclusive and painfully shy. However, he reacts with warmth and humor, enjoying the feeling of being unique, creative, passionate, empathetic. 

Dialogue Style
This character can be very shy. Discovering his feelings and opinions about things can be next to impossible. Eventually, once a safe place has been established, amazing insights and perceptions emerge. He can be self-revealing and emotionally honest. He's visited a pretty incredible place, the soul of mankind. He possesses a profound understanding of human nature and can be very perceptive about others. Sometimes seeming psychic. 

Dialogue examples: 
"He's like that because he’s lonely."
"I don't feel like going out tonight."
"I always trust my gut.

Internal Dialogue: 
"I'm unique. I feel good when I'm different."
"I must be unique."

Average Health (usually secondary character)
This character is an artist at heart, unable to express himself, except through acts of personal expression. He never feels as though he fits in anywhere, even when with friends. He's humble, sheltered, and socially inept,

He's the shy, reclusive, artist, the genius waiting to be discovered, and still in pursuit of his identity. This character has spent a great deal of time soul searching, journeying inward to discover who he might be. It seems he's perpetually in the midst of an identity crisis. The effect of this on his personal life has been devastating. His interior life is spectacular, however. 

He perceives his artwork as not representing him and who he is, but to actually be him. He identifies himself with his product. He stands behind it and perceives himself as being its soul. This character is given to periods of depression, but feels he needs that, feeling safer in such a mood. 

Dialogue Style
This character's dialogue could be scarce because he communicates through personal expression. He firmly believes that actions genuinely speak louder than words. This can be a very wonderful and interesting way to communicate. Usually, though, he tends to take things personally, becomes withdrawn, self-involved, focused on death and loss. 

Dialogue examples: 
"Why don't you understand me?"
"Someday everything's going to be great."
"Leave me alone."

Internal Dialogue: 
"I'm unique. I feel good when I'm different."
"I must be unique."

Unhealthy (usually Villain)
This character is one of the most interesting types. He exhibits a kind of soullessness. Unfortunately, he was given the task as a child to look inside to define his own identity, trying to find himself. However, something happened to him. As a child, he was abused or witnessed some horrible act. Something happened that makes it far too painful to journey internally. As a result, he never created or defined a soul. This introvert type is capable of murder without emotional attachment. He'll lash out at a representation of whatever caused the pain and abuse he suffered or at a representative of anyone who didn't help him. He has a very interesting character arc. 

Dialogue Style
This character is an introvert, which makes speech rare and seemingly unimportant. He's good with his hands, but not so with words. He will, however, be very curious about the world and how it works. He's skillful, able to focus on smaller things for comfort, to keep his mind off the internal pain. When alone, he may become preoccupied with death and loss,

Dialogue examples: 
"Why don't you understand me?"
"I have a lot of problems."
"Who am I?"

Internal Dialogue: 
"I'm unique. I feel good when I'm different."
"I must be unique."

Story Arc Improvement
This character's psychological change is to move away from painful self-consciousness to a more stable place. Someone or something gives this character a concrete sense of who he is, a place to finally rest from this constant search. Finding someone who knows his true self and likes that person does wonders, giving him stability. He becomes "whole" by appreciating what is here and accepting himself as is, which makes self-expression more of a desire and less of a need.

Story Arc Unchanged
This character is usually a helper to other characters. So, he doesn't usually change. If he does change, he has an opportunity to leap from the background and make a profound impact on the story through this action. His psychological movement goes from being internalized, lonely, and searching to establishing an identity. He discovers a stable identity and accepts it. He finds love or friendship which satisfies the lack of connection he's always felt. In his search for a connection, he trusts a protective figure, is burned, withdraws internally, then learns to trust a care-giving figure, perhaps a love interest, thereby freeing himself from this cycle of self-isolation.

Story Arc Decline
This character moves toward an unhealthy psychological state. From being a seemingly average person, although a little off, he becomes a sociopath. Emotional attachment is rare and likely it'll be to objects, such as art, food, or clothing, and may extend to members of the opposite sex. His eyes are not windows to his soul. He can be very brutal when finally pushed to act. He'll kill without emotion, pull the trigger and watch someone die without expression.

Extrovert Type
Healthy (usually Hero or Love Interest)
This character is creative, expressive, empathetic, and very intuitive. He's successfully searched inside himself and discovered the true self. This doesn't mean that his true self is without problems. He is, at least, aware of them. 

This makes it possible for him to create an expression of that self-knowledge, through art, poetry, or other means. This self-expression resonates of universal truth with other people. How others perceive these representations of himself is important. It's the how he discovers his true nature. 

This character's mistake is believing that to continue the journey self-discovery, he must become more of whatever he is. Whatever that is, such as angry, sexual, or aggressive. This can alienate others and quickly make enemies. 

Dialogue Style
The extrovert artist is hard to suppress. He creates amazing things. He'll venture out,  play, talk, or create with others. He's a communicative artist. He's primary concerned with how he's perceived others, and whether his artistic gift will soon vanish. He can be insecure which may interfere with attaining his goals. He can be self-revealing and emotionally honest. 

Dialogue examples: 
"Why don't you understand me?"
"Leave me alone, I enjoy being sad sometimes."
"I'm like everyone else."

Internal Dialogue: 
"I'm unique. I feel good when I'm different."
"I must be unique."

Average Health (usually secondary character)
This character wants to make his mark on the world. He's determined, creative, driven, and social. Most importantly, he's continuously discovering his identity. 

He's self-conscious yet outgoing. He desires to be successful but not at the cost of being common. He considers himself unique, not like anyone else, capable of incredible personal expression. 

No matter what situation he's in, expressing that uniqueness is very important. He might be the accountant who wears tie-die shirts or frequently sings at the local nightclub. He is in touch with his feelings and cries easily. He may be given to periods of deep depression. 

Dialogue Style
This character possesses a profound understanding of human behavior. He easily and intuitively knows people's true motivations. Desiring to be unique, he's unlikely to be hindered by social conventions. He's very interested in what others think, as this may provide clues to his own identity. At times, he may exaggerate reality in order to make life more dramatic. At times, he'll focus too much on death and loss. He tends to take things personally, be easily hurt, become withdrawn, and self-involved.

Dialogue examples: 
"I'm pretty funny, aren't I?" 
"What do you think of this tie?" 
"That guy's a liar." 

Internal Dialogue: 
"I'm unique. I feel good when I'm different."
"I must be unique."

Unhealthy (usually Villain)
This character is a profoundly unhealthy person. If he was abused as a child, he has a soulless feeling about him. Abuse disallowed him from looking internally for his identity. He never discovered his true self. Resultantly, he has no identity. He's lost, not sure who he is, all the while trying to keep his hatred of the abuser contained and controlled. At this point in his life, the dam's about to burst. 

If he was once very healthy, repeated failure at achieving his dreams turned this character on himself. He becomes self-destructive and believes anything he's created should be destroyed as well. When he lashes out at others, his fury immediately comes back to haunt him and manifests itself in a self-destructive manner. 

Dialogue Style
This extrovert type will be involved with other people, seeing the health of his relationships as indicators as to what kind of person he is. He's always searching for his identity, where he fits in, what kind of person he's going to be. In either of the case, abused or not, the primary concern is his identity and whether he is flawed. He can become preoccupied with death and loss. 

Dialogue examples: 
"Why did I do that?"
"What am I, nuts?"
"Why do you even like me?" 

Internal Dialogue: 
"I'm unique. I feel good when I'm different."
"I must be unique."

Story Arc Improvement
This character will move psychologically toward being even healthier, finding a solid foundation to build his identity upon, possibly a love that understands this character or a regained connection to a person from the past who knows him. Through this experience, he becomes "whole" by appreciating what is here and accepting himself as is, which makes self-expression more of a desire and less of a need.

Story Arc Unchanged
This character is usually a helper to other characters. So, he doesn't usually change. If he does change, it's usually toward a more healthy position with a knowledge of who he is and a discarding of certain, possibly destructive, experimentation. If he takes a downward slide into unhealthiness, he turns against himself, perceiving he's failed and it's his own fault. He may become self-punishing, even suicidal.

Story Arc Decline
This character moves toward an unhealthy psychological state. If his condition was caused by early abuse, he becomes destructive to whatever in the environment represents either the abuser or the person who failed to help him. This lashing out happens quickly, without warning, and without emotion. If he's failed to achieve his dreams, he'll blame himself and slip into a self-hatred that may end in self-destruction and certainly the destruction of anything he might have produced, any representation of self. He becomes the typical artist on a self-destructive rampage.


Additional Resources
The Quintessential Character 

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